News

Course on Personalism in Medicine to be offered Fall 2018

Author: Cliff Djajapranata

 The College of Science will be offering a 1.5-credit pass/fail course in the Fall semester called “Introduction to Personalism in Medicine: The Pathos Project.”

 

Founded by medical students and physicians in 2005, the course stems from a deep concern over the depersonalization of medical care. Compassion, empathy, and attention to the suffering patient are too often left as glaring holes during clinical interactions. While not the sole cause of this failure, deficiencies in medical training undoubtedly contribute. The Pathos Project recognizes that developing clinical competence is necessary but not sufficient for physicians and other clinicians, and responds to the crisis in the doctor-patient relationship by developing a consciousness of suffering and its contextual interpersonal dynamics. …

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Science-business softball player helps raise funds for cancer patients

Author: Cliff Djajapranata

Berionts 250

When senior science-business major Katie Beriont signed on to play Division I softball for the University of Notre Dame, she never thought her effort on the field would make an impact on the lives of cancer patients and their families. Now in her final season, Beriont has taken a role in organizing the team’s 8th annual Strikeout Cancer event.

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Enzyme in bacteria initiates repair of cell walls damaged by antibiotics

Author: Deanna Csomo McCool

Shahriar Mobashery

Beta-lactam antibiotics, including penicillin, are one of the most widely used class of antibiotics in the world. Though they’ve been in use since the 1940s, scientists still don’t fully understand what happens when this class of drugs encounters bacteria. Now, researchers at the University of Notre Dame have elucidated how an enzyme helps bacteria rebound from damage inflicted by antibiotics not strong enough to immediately kill the bacteria on contact.

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Natural bacterial proteins may prove viable alternatives to antibiotics

Author: Deanna Csomo McCool

Fields 250

Tiny proteins found in the genomes of some types of bacteria are effective weapons against a wide range of other bacteria, opening the door for the development of new therapies in the age of antibiotic resistance, according to new research at the University of Notre Dame.

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Biological Sciences graduate student selected to attend National Graduate Student Symposium at St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital

Author: Cliff Djajapranata

Zach Schafer Mark Hawk 250

Every spring, St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital hosts the National Graduate Student Symposium (NGSS). The Symposium is held for the nation’s top Ph.D. students to present their work and learn more about St. Jude’s advanced research and facilities, which is located in Memphis, Tenn. This year, among more than 1500 applicants who had to be invited to apply, only 41 were selected. Notre Dame biology graduate student Mark Hawk is among this year’s attendees.

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Women’s basketball walk-on aspires to be orthopedic surgeon

Author: Cliff Djajapranata

Kaitlin Cole 250

Kaitlin Cole, like many other sophomores in the College of Science, intends to go to medical school after graduation. She also has dreams of becoming an orthopedic surgeon. Unlike many other aspiring doctors, however, Cole has a rigorous athletics schedule — as a member of the Notre Dame women’s top-five NCAA basketball team.

 

 

 

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Faculty hope to make virtual reality the next frontier in treating phobias

Author: Carrie Gates

Main Building in the Fall

For a team of Notre Dame psychologists, virtual reality is more than a game — it is the next frontier in mental health treatment. Nathan Rose, Jennifer Hames, and Michael Villano are conducting research on the use of virtual reality environments in exposure therapy for participants with a fear of heights. The technology also holds promise for treating phobias like the fear of flying and post-traumatic stress disorder.

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